Zika Virus Statistics & Map

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According to the CDC, here is the statistical report for the U.S. Between January 2015 and October 2018, there is a report of 231 locally transmitted cases and 5,442 travel-associated cases of Zika.

Before the year 2014, only a few cases of Zika virus disease associated with travel were identified in the United States. The game changed in 2015 and 2016 when there were significant outbreaks of the Zika virus happened in the Americas. This caused an increase in travel-associated cases in the United States, limited local transmission in Florida and Texas, and a widespread transmission in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

By the year 2017, the number of reported cases of Zika virus disease began to decline in the United States. The years 2018 and 2019 welcomed an era of no reports of the transmission of the virus through mosquitoes in the Continental United States. In the year 2019, there is no reported case of confirmed Zika virus disease from any of the territories in the United States.

The yearly Zika case counts for states and territories in the US give us an idea of what is happening. In 2015, Zika was not yet a nationally notifiable disease, but Zika cases could be reported to the national surveillance system for arthropod-borne diseases (ArboNET). The final 2015 data reported are summarized below:

U.S. States: 62 symptomatic Zika virus disease cases were reported. All 62 cases were in travelers who returned from an affected region. None was acquired through presumed local transmission by a mosquito. No case was also acquired from sexual, laboratory or blood transmission.

U.S. territories: 10 symptomatic cases of Zika virus disease were reported. One case was reported in a traveler from an affected region. 9 cases because when it comes to local transmission, it is impossible to say if the infection was due to mosquito bites or sexual intercourse.

In the year 2016, the viral disease became a notifiable disease nationwide. Using standard case definitions, cases were reported to the CDC by departments in state, territorial, and local health. Here is the yearly case count, as reported to ArboNET for the virus disease.

U.S. States: 5,168 symptomatic Zika virus disease cases were reported. Of these, 4,897 cases were in travelers returning from affected areas. Through presumed local transmission through mosquito bites, 218 cases in Florida, and 6 cases in Texas making a total of 224. Cases reported through other route was brought to a total of 47 with 45 from sexual transmission, one from laboratory transmission and the remaining one from person-to-person through an unidentified route.

U.S. Territories: 36,512 symptomatic cases of Zika virus disease were reported. Of these, 145 cases were from travelers to affected regions. Through presumed local transmission by infected mosquitoes, 36,367 cases acquired the virus. No case was reported to have been acquired through other means.

The yearly case count for 2017 shows that Zika is widely known as a notifiable disease in the nation. The cases reported to ArboNET is given below:

U.S. States: 452 symptomatic Zika virus disease cases were reported. Out of these, 437 cases were in travelers returning from affected areas. Cases acquired through presumed local transmission through mosquito bites, 2 cases in Florida, and 5 cases in Texas making a total of 7. Cases reported through other routes summed up to 8 with seven from the sexual transmission and one from laboratory transmission.

U.S. Territories: 666 symptomatic cases of Zika virus disease were reported. Only 1 case was reported to be from a traveler to affected regions. Through presumed local transmission by infected mosquitoes, 665 cases acquired the virus. No case was reported to have been acquired through other routes.

The yearly case count for 2018 was also made available. Cases are reported to CDC using standard case definitions by state, territorial, and local health departments.

U.S. States: 74 Zika virus disease cases were reported. From this data, 73 cases were in travelers returning from affected areas. No case was reported to have been acquired through presumed local transmission through mosquito bites. Cases reported through other route shows 1 case from laboratory exposure and none from sexual transmission.

U.S. Territories: 148 symptomatic cases of Zika virus disease were reported. Only 1 case was reported to be from a traveler to affected regions. Through presumed local transmission by infected mosquitoes, 147 cases acquired the virus. No case was reported to have been acquired through other routes.

In 2019 again, cases are reported to the CDC by state, territorial, and local health departments with the use of standard case definitions. As at the 5th of December, 2019, the following provisional data on Zika virus was reported to ArboNet for 2019:

U.S. States: 17 Zika virus disease cases were reported. Of these, 16 cases were in travelers returning from affected areas. Through presumed local transmission through mosquito bites, no case was reported. No case was reported to have been acquired through sexual transmission but 1 case was acquired from laboratory exposure.

U.S. Territories: 52 cases of Zika virus disease were reported where 2 cases were from travelers returning from affected regions. Through presumed local transmission by infected mosquitoes, 55 cases acquired the virus. No case was reported to have been acquired through other routes.

Another important statistic to be considered here is the effect of Zika on pregnancy and babies born to infected mothers. Since the outbreak of Zika virus in the Americas in 2015, scientists and clinicians have collaborated. They are working tirelessly to understand the adverse effects of Zika virus infection on the pregnant mother and the growing baby in her. Although there is still much to uncover about this virus, notable progress has been recorded.

Statistics show that the proportion of babies born with congenital disabilities is 5-10%. Records revealed that about 2 in 20 babies (10%) with confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy in the US states and 1 in 20 (5%) in US territories had congenital disabilities associated with the Zika virus. As of July 2018, the CDC already confirmed Zika viral infections in more than 2,474 pregnant women in the U.S. states. For the US territories, more than 4,900 cases in pregnant women were confirmed.

Research has also shown that 2 in 25 (8%), pregnant women with symptoms of Zika virus infection had a baby with Zika-associated birth defects in the US states. This is compared with 3 in 25 (12%) pregnant women without symptoms of Zika virus infection.

On the other hand, in the US territories, about 1 in 25 (5%), pregnant women showing symptoms of Zika virus infection delivered a baby with Zika-associated birth defects, which when compared with about 2 in 25 (7%) pregnant women without symptoms of Zika virus infection.